Dr. Clifton Thomas
DELIVERING WEIGHT LOSS RESULTS THAT LAST!

Bariatric Surgery in Baytown, TX 77520

Bariatric Surgery: Consulting With a Gastric Bypass Surgeon | Clifton Thomas MD

One of the most common bariatric procedures out there, and for a good reason, is bariatric surgery. It’s incredibly effective at helping people lose weight fast. However, bariatric surgery is not without risks. Consulting with a gastric bypass surgeon is necessary before deciding whether or not bariatric surgery is right for you.

Here are some things an expert gastric bypass surgeon, Clifton Thomas MD, recommends you to know before consulting an appointment for bariatric surgery.

What is a gastric bypass surgeon?

A gastric bypass surgeon is a bariatric surgeon who specializes in bariatrics. They are trained to perform bariatric procedures, including gastric bypass surgery, lap band surgery, and gastric sleeve surgery. 

Clifton Thomas MD specializes in this field and has performed several bariatric procedures for patients in Baytown TX and Harris County.

How does bariatric surgery work?

Clifton Thomas MD will recommend this surgery to you if you’re an adult with a BMI of at least 40 or over 35 with another weight-related health complication like diabetes, sleep apnea, or heart disease in Harris County. 

The most common type of bariatric procedure done by Clifton Thomas MD is a gastric bypass or ‘stomach stapling.’ It involves a gastric bypass surgeon taking a patient’s stomach and dividing it into two sections. The smaller section, which contains the new ‘pouch,’ will not handle as much food at once anymore.

The pouch will then be connected directly to the part of the small intestine, bypassing most of your old stomach and duodenum (the top portion of your small intestine). This effectively reduces how many calories you can process in one sitting because fewer nutrients are absorbed by this route than passing through the entire digestive tract like usual.

After this procedure has been performed on you, your stomach will be smaller than it was before. This means that much less of it can enter your body when you eat food now because there’s just not enough room for big meals anymore! Plus, once your gut gets used to eating smaller amounts of food at each mealtime over time (usually after about six months), hunger cravings should decrease significantly as well.

How much weight can I lose after bariatric surgery?

hand with gloves holding a knife for surgery

People who undergo bariatrics typically see an average loss of about 70% percent of their excess weight within two years following bariatric surgery.

There’s no precise way to predict how much weight you’ll end up losing. Still, bariatric experts like Clifton Thomas MD agree that gastric bypass is the most effective bariatric procedure out there for helping people lose significant amounts of weight.

What are the potential risks of bariatric surgery?

Clifton Thomas MD has performed several bariatric procedures for over 21 years now. So by now, they’ve got a pretty good idea about what kinds of complications might arise from bariatrics in general or bariatric surgeries specifically. 

While it’s true that some patients who go through with bariatrics will be fine and never experience any complications at all, others may develop one or more specific problems associated with their particular kind of bariatric.

Since bariatric surgery is major surgery, there are some severe bariatric risks involved that need to be considered before deciding whether gastric bypass is proper for you:

Nausea/vomiting

After surgery, one common side effect can be nausea and vomiting in your early recovery period (usually within the first few weeks). This usually happens due to food sensitivities when eating certain foods again after this surgery has been performed on you. Therefore, patients must stick to a low-fat bariatric diet during recovery, which will help to reduce these bariatric risks.

Dehydration

Another bariatrics risk is dehydration, which can be caused by not drinking enough fluids after gastric bypass surgery has been performed on you or from vomiting too much due to nausea and food sensitivities post-surgery. This bariatrics risk can lead to serious medical complications if it’s left untreated for too long, so make sure that you take steps each day to drink more water than what your body usually needs before this happens!

Diarrhea/constipation

Not being able to digest the bariatric foods that you eat anymore can also lead to diarrhea or constipation, which are two bariatric risks that most gastric bypass patients have experienced at some point after surgery.

Who should not have this surgery done?

Bariatrics is typically safe for people who are at least 100 pounds overweight. Still, there are some exceptions you will want to talk about with your bariatric surgeon before getting bariatric!

Some health conditions that may make it dangerous for you to get bariatrics include:

Why do people want bariatric surgery?

After consulting with Clifton Thomas MD, many people decide that they’re ready for bariatric surgery because of its many benefits.

Some expected bariatric benefits associated with this procedure include:

Bariatric surgery in Baytown TX can help you lose weight, have more energy than ever before, fit into clothes better than you could in the past, and improve your overall physical appearance – things like that.

But most importantly, bariatrics helps people live longer, healthier lives, so it’s worth considering if you’ve tried everything else out there first without success. If you live in Baytown, or Harris County consulting with the nearest gastric surgeon, like Clifton Thomas MD is the way to go for this. 

Wrapping Up

If you want to lose weight for health reasons, you should learn about the risks and benefits of bariatric surgery.

Some people might need surgery to lose weight. For instance, it is an effective way for people at risk of obesity-related diseases like high blood pressure or type 2 diabetes.

You might want to think about which surgery would be best for your needs before deciding which one is right for you.

Clifton Thomas MD does best in these procedures to guarantee a safe and successful performance that will benefit you for years to come.

To know more details and consultation about Bariatric Surgery, consult with a Gastric Bypass Surgeon today in Baytown, TX. Call us at 713-936-0777 now!


Some information about Baytown, TX

Baytown is a city in the U.S. state of Texas, within Harris and Chambers counties. Located in the Houston–The Woodlands–Sugar Land metropolitan statistical area, it lies on the northern side of the Galveston Bay complex near the outlets of the San Jacinto River and Buffalo Bayou. It is the sixth-largest city within this metropolitan area and seventh largest community. Major highways serving the city include State Highway 146 and Interstate 10. At the 2010 U.S. census, Baytown had a population of 71,802, and it had an estimated population of 77,192 in 2019.

White American settlers first arrived in the now-Baytown area in 1822. One of its earliest settlers was Nathaniel Lynch, who set up a ferry crossing at the junction of the San Jacinto River and Buffalo Bayou. The still-operating ferry service is known as the Lynchburg Ferry. Other early settlers of Baytown included William Scott, one of Stephen F. Austin’s Old Three Hundred, and Ashbel Smith, who owned a plantation in the area.

The city now known as Baytown was originally three separate towns. The first of these was Goose Creek, named for the bayou of the same name where Canada geese wintered and whose name is still reflected in the area’s Goose Creek school district, whose establishment dates back to before 1850. With the discovery of the Goose Creek Oil Field, the rival communities of Pelly in the late 1910s, and East Baytown in the early 1920s, developed as early boomtowns. The ‘East’ in East Baytown was later dropped because it was west of Goose Creek.

Serious talk of merging the three cities began shortly after World War I, but the community of Baytown was opposed to this idea. However, in 1947, the three cities finally agreed to consolidate. The citizens settled on the name Baytown for the new combined city. Baytown as it is known today was officially founded January 24, 1948.

Learn more about Baytown.

Map of Baytown, TX


Here are some doctor-related links.

← Previous Service LocationNext Service Location →